Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour (Mixture #1 from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day)

Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour (Mixture #1 from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day)

By keeping a supply of our two gluten-free flour mixtures in the house, you can make any of the recipes in Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Flour Mixture #1, reprinted here from the book, is for a mostly white flour, though it becomes 75% whole-grain by weight if you swap brown rice flour (increase the liquids in the recipes by 2 tablespoons if you do this). It’s the only flour you need for some of our on-line recipes, and for the basic white loaf. If you’re sensitive to any of these ingredients, you’ll find substitutions in the book. We tested this gluten-free all-purpose flour mixture with Bob’s Red Mill products because they are available across the nation. If you use other brands you may find different results in the breads–especially in the amount of liquid they’ll absorb.

If you’re measuring by U.S. cup-measures (the first unit in each line), be sure to pack the flour tightly into the cup, as if you were measuring brown sugar.

Makes 4 1/4 pounds (2 kilograms) of gluten-free all-purpose flour mixture

White Rice Flour6 cups, or 36 ounces, or 1,020 grams

Sorghum flour: 3 1/4 cups, or 1 pound, or 455 grams

Tapioca Flour or Starch: 1 3/4 cups, or 8 ounces, or 225 grams

Potato Starch*: 1 1/4 cups, or 8 ounces, or 225 grams

Xanthan Gum or Psyllium Husk Powder: 1/4 cup, or 1.4 ounces, or 40 grams

*Don’t substitute potato flour

The ingredients must be very well mixed, otherwise the xanthan gum or psyllium will not be evenly distributed and your loaves will be inconsistent. Whisk and mix the ingredients in a 5- to 6-quart lidded container. Finish by picking up the container and vigorously shaking until the flours are completely blended.

Substituting ingredients: If you don’t eat one of the ingredients above, see our Substitutions Page. Other substitutions may be possible, but those are the ones we’ve tested and liked.



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149 thoughts on “Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour (Mixture #1 from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day)

  1. I have enjoyed your original book for years. My husband is now wheat allergic, not gluten. I have tried your gluten free version which is very good but I am wondering if you have tried other flours which contain gluten such as barley? I love baking with Teff. Have you tried any of your gluten free recipes using a small amount of teff in place of the brown rice flour? I look forward to the response.

  2. I think the GF recipe is awesome! As a consumer of the flour based products and diagnosed with a Wheat allergy, I have struggled to find a recipe that tastes the same as regularbread. This is a Great recipe. However, I would recommend a “Helpful Hint” about clean up.

    It is an extremely sticky gooey dough, and it can be a little difficult to remove from items, knives, spoons, bowls. I do not recommend putting to much of it down the drain as it can stick to piping and is not fully soluble, even when run through the Garbage disposal with hot water. I wiped most it off with paper towels before cleaning with water and dishwashing liquid. The clean up is then fairly simple and minimized residual when doing it this way.

    Happy Baking!!

  3. RE: Xanthan Gum or Psyllium
    I read elsewhere that 1 tsp. xanthan gum is the equivalent to 1 TBSP psyllium husk powder in yeast bread baking.I see your Master formula gives 1/4 cup xanthan or psyllium husk powder. Is this correct? The same amount of either?
    Thanks for your help

    1. Hi Carie,

      I wonder if it is just that we packed the psyllium into the cup more and not that yours is somehow much lighter than what we used? I think you should go with the 1.4 ounces, since that is what we tested it with. To be on the safe side, you may want to start with a half batch to make sure you are happy with the results.

      Thanks, Zoë

  4. Thanks for responding. It turns out if I ground up the psyllium more it got closer to your measurement of 1/4 cup. I did however have an issue that my bread did not rise. I am thinking it’s either I used new yeast straight from the freezer (which I thought you said was okay on an instagram video) or my water wasn’t hot enough at 100 Deg F… any thoughts? I will try again!

    1. Hi Carie,

      The yeast will thaw out within seconds of being removed from the freezer and certainly once added to warm water. I would check your yeast and make sure it is active. Just proof it in some warm water with a tiny bit of sugar for about 10 minutes. If it gets foamy, you can use it in the dough.

      If the water wasn’t warm enough it will just take the dough longer to rise.

      Thanks, Zoë

  5. Thanks for your response. I proofed the yeast and it foamed so I will try making again and add a little sugar next time! Thanks again have a great day.

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