Contact

Arrange interviews, print media, or television, please contact our publicist John Karle at [email protected].

Questions about using adapted versions of our recipes or other material on your website or in a publication, please click here for more information.

Advertising opportunities with BreadIn5, just post into any of the “Comments” fields.

Answering readers’ questions: Click on Ask a Question

Speaking engagement and teaching schedules through Macmillan Speakers Bureau:

Jeff Hertzberg through Macmillan Speakers

Zoe Francois through Macmillan Speakers

To arrange a speaking engagement or a baking class with the Authors, please contact:

[email protected]

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1,762 thoughts on “Contact

  1. Hi! Love your recipes and have been making bread every single day. If I were to bake ten loaves at a time, do you have a recommended length and temperature? Thanks so much!

  2. Congratulations on your book Gluten Free Bread in Five Minutes a Day, I’m trying to make bread of this type, on page 64 I used instant yeast, 1%, is that correct?
    Thanks for your reply.

  3. Hello,

    I bought your Gluten Free Artisan Bread book and am making wonderful breads. My favorite so far after making the basic recipe is the 100% whole grain with buckwheat. I so appreciate your guidance in making these tasty breads; they are definitely better than anything store bought. One quick question, I always make the loaf version rather than the boule because I love open faced sandwiches. The initial loaf recipe calls for 2 pounds of dough and I’ve continued to use that amount for the whole grain breads. It makes a great loaf. Is that the right amount?

    Thanks for writing such a great book!

    1. Kay:

      Sure– but the question is whether you’re satisfied with the size of the slices–too small? Use more? Too large? Use less.

  4. Hello: What measurements (Tablespoons, teaspoons etc.) do I use in your bread recipes to substitute Instant Yeast for Active Dry Yeast? I have been using your Master recipe and now I need to substitute Active Dry Yeast to Instant Yeast. I love your recipes and your book (the newest version). Will try Pita bread today. Help! Thank you. Linda

  5. I purchased your “The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day” about a month ago. WOW do I love this book. For years I used my Mother’s bread recipe – which was great – but this book is fabulous. I can’t believe how simple bread making has become. I just took a loaf out of the oven. Man CAN live on bread alone. Thank you for working so hard on these recipes.

  6. Hello!
    I just made my first artisan bread (the original boule) in a handmade clay pot by Miriams Earthen Cookware. She is the only one in the US to make these pots herself and they are perfect for bread! You can also make multiple other things in them and use on stove or in oven. I thought I’d connect you together because the combination of your simple delicious recipe and the clay cookware made the bread amazing. I’m not selling anything haha, just wanted to connect two great ideas together! I’m going to send your link to her as well.

    P.S I’m doing this for a food project in schools called the Happiness of Food. It fits right in!

    Thank you!

    1. Hi Annie,

      This sounds fantastic, so glad you are enjoying all the bread. The cloche sounds like a great way to bake. We use clay pots to bake our bread a lot too.

      Cheers, Zoë

  7. Hi! My sister and I are having a pizza party on Saturday(6/9) for 10 people. I have both books artisan bread and the artisan pizza and flatbread. I was wondering if I could cook the pizzas blind on one side ahead of time,( say that afternoon) to save time and not have to quickly top them ON the grill? Basically par-bake . Will it ruin the texture ? My husband usually mans the grill so it would’ve easier if I had them prepped ready when he pulls off 2 finished ones etc. Thank you

    1. Hi Sarah,

      You can partake the crusts or even roll them out and freeze the disks. Either way works, you’ll just have to give it a try and see how you like the finished pizzas.

      Have fun! Zoë

  8. Hi,

    I am enjoying your books and have made several batches of dough. Are your books translated in Dutch? My mother would love to give it a try but has trouble with the English.
    Looking forward to your reply.

    1. Hi Thelma,

      I am so thrilled you are enjoying the bread. So far we don’t have a Dutch publisher, but hope someday we will.

      Cheers, Zoe

  9. hello from Canada.., Thank you so much for putting together The New Artisan Bread in five minutes a day.. I actually tried your bread recipe awhile back .. and continued to bake the same bread recipe.. Then I thought I would borrow the book from our library .. well fell in love with all the recipe , I really had no choice but to buy it.., I don’t usually buy cook/baking books ..But I have to admit yours was to good not to buy. Looking forward to trying some of the other recipes. I do have one question, my whole wheat bread is a little on the heavy side , anything I can do to make it not as dense. Thanks and good luck with your newest holiday book I will have to wait until it get to my library to take a peek LOL.

    1. Thanks for the kind words! Canadian flours tend to have a little more protein than their US counterparts (with which we test). That means they absorb more water, and as a result, sometimes the dough can be a little drier than our intention, which leads to a heavier result. If that’s the issue, it’ll be addressed by increasing the water a little. Maybe 2 tablespoons?

    2. Hi Mary, I’m in Canada too and use Robin Hood Best for Bread Multigrain flour – I use 2 cups of it with 4.5 cups of unbleached all purpose flour (PC no name, which is Robin Hood flour also). This combination makes a nice light loaf (depending on the length for the rise.) The other ingredients are 2 2/3 cups water, 1 tbsp each of yeast, salt, sugar and olive oil.

      When I started making the Bread in 5 recipes, I kept the dough in a container in the fridge but now I bake both loaves right away, slice and freeze the bread. I find that the dough rises better if I don’t refrigerate it.

      Be sure to try the pizza dough … it’s really good!

      1. Glad our recipes are working for you, Susan. I like seeing how everyone adapts this stuff to their own needs. It’s all very forgiving.

  10. I have a healthy and happy gluten free sourdough starter. I have been unable to blend it with your recipe for gluten free Master recipe Boule, which I love. The sourdough base is Sorghum, brown rice and buckwheat. Do you have a recipe recommendation for gluten free sourdough?
    When I have tried to blend the starter into the Boule it comes out flat and raw in the middle.

    1. We haven’t experimented with a sourdough approach to GF, because we feared the result you’ve experienced. The compromise might be to use yeast, in addition to sourdough starter, so you’d get the flavor, but the rise would come from commercial yeast. GF is denser in the first place, and sourdough levain has less rising power, so this would have been my guess.

  11. I recently purchased a loaf of Schar multigrain gluten free bread. It was quite good and one of the reasons I purchased it was the package said NON GMO on the side.
    does that mean the soy is non GMO as well as other ingredients??
    Very important to know. Thank you

    1. Not familiar with that–but please note, we use this website to answer questions about our book series, not bread in general, whether wheat or gluten-free.

  12. Hello,
    Can I start with telling you how much I LOVE the gluten free artisan bread book and all the delicious recipes in it?! I bought the book a few years ago but something stopped me from actually trying out, but now I’m hooked!

    I am a Celiac, amateur cook and photographer and I started to share my recipes on Facebook and my website years ago and recently Instagram (www.pur-nutrish.com) and I was wondering if I could share some of the recipes? Kind regards, Carin de Kruijf

    1. Hi Carin,

      I am so thrilled that you are enjoying all of the bread you are baking! Thank you so much for asking. We have several recipes here on the website and prefer that you link to those, instead of republishing them on another site.

      Enjoy and thank you for the lovely note! Zoë

  13. I love your method of making lovely bread, much like what I grew up eating in Germany.
    I have offered to make 120 rolls for a wedding in May and I’d like to know how many rolls a bucket of dough makes in general so that I can figure out how many batches to make in all.

    1. Hi Holly,

      What a great contribution to the wedding! How many rolls will depend on the size you make. It looks like you are making the Master Recipe, which makes 3 pounds 12 ounces (1700g) of dough, so you can just divide that by the size of the buns you want.

      Enjoy! Zoë

  14. I am wondering if you have ever considered replacing your ‘Ask Question’ link with a forum that authors and followers can reply and interact in? I have participated and moderated a few forums which can become excellent resources for questions as well as sharing tips and feedback on a subject (in this case bread and GF bread). The neat point of a forum is that it can be categorized into sections – dough, ingredients, equipment, success and challenges, etc.. Doing that allows one to find and read previous questions/comments as well as feedback additional information.

    I have never set up a WordPress forum, but I do know that is an option as I have participated on a few which were within the WordPress program. Yes, there would have to be moderators – initially authors? – but on any decent active forum I’ve been a part of, upstanding members usually volunteer to assist in those duties.

    A forum really could help increase participation and encouragement of usage of your excellent ‘5 min. ‘ method.

    Suncerely – Katcha

    1. Hi Katcha,

      Thank you for the suggestion. Forums really can be a good resource for people and we have considered it. It’s good to know that you’d find it helpful.

      Thanks, Zoe

      1. Zoe if you would like to discuss forum potentials further, feel free to contact me and I can share what insights I have. – Katcha

      2. Hi Zoe (& Jeff),

        I have created a free forum for GF Artisan Bread. I copied over all the Q&A posts from this site and put them into an organized order (Equipment, Ingredients, Praise/concerns, Recipes, Techniques).
        The forum is not ready for release use by your fans as I would like for you (both?) to review it and see if you would like to make changes/additions before its launched.

        You will need to contact me (I’m assuming your web site has my email address) so that I can provide you a link and access to the forum ‘as is’.

        Best wishes and happy GF bread baking!! – Katcha

      3. Katcha: We intentionally don’t index any of the material on our site, because the site is something we did strictly to assist readers of our books. We don’t intend for any web-based medium to be used as a standalone resource for bread-baking. If our site was indexed, then people could pretty much use it as a substitute for our books, which undermines our attempt to make a living from this work (which is not easy).

        Given that, we’d refer you to our copyright page (link address is below), and sincerely and respectfully ask that you don’t publish the forum you’re proposing. Copying material from our site and putting into your own site violates copyright law and raises the hackles of our publisher (Macmillan, one of the largest in the world). Macmillan rather unpredictably goes after copyright violators. But aside from that–please just don’t do it.

        Thanks, Jeff
        https://artisanbreadinfive.com/2010/01/02/can-i-use-your-recipes-on-my-website-in-my-class-or-in-a-publication/

    2. I so understand what your concerns are for ‘substituting’ your book with a forum. My intention for such a forum would be to only organize the Q&As into a more reference-able format. It also could allow feedback on the book’s recipes between end users of the book.

      I have created the format that you are welcome to look over, but I have not launchded it. I would await your OK before I did that. One of the benefits of such an alternative to your Q&A current link would be that readers could find already asked questions and you wouldn’t have to answer the same question time after time.

      1. Thanks for agreeing not to launch the site without our OK. As above, copyright law prohibits your reprinting material from our site, so we can’t agree to it. Thanks again.

      2. Thanks for agreeing not to launch the site without our OK. As above, copyright law prohibits your reprinting material from our site, so we can’t agree to it. Thanks again.

  15. ……we have considered it. But…??

    Hello Zoe,

    I think it’s a wonderful idea! I would be thrilled!

    Best wishes,
    Susi

  16. Hi, I love your method! I mainly make the classic boule and the pizza crust from the classic recipe. I’m wondering if it is possible to make the Challah or Brioche with a ghee instead of butter? There is a dairy allergy in my house, and while he cannot have butter, he can have ghee. Or would another fat work in its place? Thank you so much for considering this.

    1. Hi Jocelyn,

      I am certain it will work with the challah, since that dough can be made with oil or butter and has less fat in it. The dough may be slightly stiffer after refrigerating, but just very slightly.

      Enjoy! Zoë

  17. Hi:
    just thought you might want to know that an ad displaying a “Tokyo Smoke Stack” appears on your last post for CrockPot Challah Bread. Wasn’t sure if this was the kind of advertising you wanted on your site.
    Rose

  18. I wanted to thank you for this, your body of work. The both of you. My first foray into bread making was a disaster for the same reason I couldn’t be a machinist. Acidic skin. I kill yeast. Period no analogy. I’ve put the dough made by myself and my wife under a microscope. We made the same dough. My yeast was dead, hers was active and thriving.
    Anyhow, your book inspired me after I saw the article in Mother Earth News, and have been trying to make non-brick bread since.

    The two factors which FINALLY made it work for me are your no-knead methods and recipes, and culturing a starter in my own environment, at home.

    The bio compatibility, may or may not be a factor, I’m not a physician, or a microbiologist. But once is a chance, twice could be a coincidence, three times is a process that works (with apologies to Ian Fleming).

  19. During this time of pandemic, I wanted to thank you for your work with this method of baking bread. I have been using your recipes to bake bread every three days. I recently gave a loaf to someone who picked up butter for me when he went to the store. It is so easy to bake and we are enjoying REALLY GOOD BREAD. The only thing that will stop the flow of bread is a shortage of ingredients. Have two back up bags of flour and am awiting delivery of yeast. Have enough til then. Thanks again to making this “stay at home” time easier.

  20. Hi made the Chocolate bread dough and after proofing kept in refrigerator..it was too sticky after refrigerating it for 16hours..made it freeform..after an hour its spreading too much and flat..what’s the reason??? Followed the recipe from the blog

    1. Do you mean this post on our blog?
      Chocolate Bread… Yes, chocolate!
      That’s meant to be baked in a loaf pan, not as a free-form.

  21. I am enjoying my new Artisan Bread in Five Minutes book. Thank you. I’ve been baking bread at home for a long time, but have not used your technique.

    I started with the master recipe but substituted 30% high gluten whole wheat flour and added an additional extra 1/3 cup of flour. Moisture seemed good.
    On the initial rise for two hours it grew very well, and without deflating it, I put the tub in the fridge overnight. I decided to make the crusty white loaf recipe. After a brief shaping, careful not to deflate it, I placed it in a standard loaf pan. It probably filled 1/3 or more of the pan as expected.
    After a full two hour rise, it only filled 1/2 the pan. Usually my other loaves will crest the top of the pan within two hours in a warmed oven.
    I baked it at 450, but it did not spring much and did not crest the top of the pan like your photo on page 79.
    I’d appreciate your tips on how to fill the loaves pan with risen bread! Thank you.
    David

    1. David, you’ve made a much drier, less resilient dough than our Master recipe in that book. To get results like what you see in our pictures, and modifying with the flour you’ve added, you’d need more water. 15% more? You’ll need to experiment. The dough needs to look like what’s in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIb8fC9BdWs&t=125s … and once you have the hydration adjusted, fill the pan about 3/4-full.

      1. Thank you Jeff. I thought it seemed moist enough, but it’s nothing like the video you referenced. Maybe I should listen to you and follow the instructions? LOL.
        Thank you for your tips.
        David

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