Cyber Monday sales: “New Artisan Bread in Five..” and “Best of Artisan Bread in Five…”

Amazon is running a Cyber Monday sale on two of my most popular books, The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day ($15.01), and The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day ($12.87). Just for today. Hope you all had a great Thanksgiving!

Note: This website is reader-supported. When you purchase through links on the site, BreadIn5 LLC earns a commission.

Fifteen Years of Thanksgiving Recipes: Breads for the Holiday

I’ve already started planning for Thursday’s baking, and looking back over all the old recipes here on the website took me back to great times and great meals with family and friends going back to 2007 or so, when the blog began. Above is a favorite of mine, Thanksgiving Cranberry Corn Bread, but here are dozens more: Click here for the recipe list and links, and be sure to click on “Older Posts” when you get to the bottom of the page (eventually the pages start showing some non-Thanksgiving stuff). You’ll find dinner rolls, crock pot recipes, pumpkin swirl brioche, pull-apart buns, stuffing, German pumpkin seed rolls and much more.

Happy Thanksgiving!

New York Times Cooking: 40 Recipes for “Procrastibaking”

Back in 2007, the New York Times Cooking section wrote that the BreadIn5 method produced a “crusty, full-flavored loaf that may be the world’s easiest yeast bread.” Today, the New York Times Cooking app came out with “40 Recipes for Procrastibaking… in other worlds, things you can mix in advance, and bake later. And the BreadIn5 recipe for a simple crusty loaf is one of the 40! You can decrease the yeast from what they reported on in 2007– a tablespoon is enough. If you’re on my site, you probably know about my method, but the other 39 also look terrific. Some other links:

Soon The Bread Will Be Making Itself

The Basic BreadIn5 method, with photos

And finally, our greatest hits book, The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, is on sale at at the moment– 60% off (so it’s just $13.00)–click to view on Amazon. If you’re checking this after March 2022, the price may vary from that…

Zeppole (Italian Christmas doughnuts): with Instagram-Live event

Zeppole are a traditional Italian doughnut–a Christmas treat, but the internet holds many different descriptions and definitions of what they are. Some versions are carefully piped, some are made as small doughnut holes, and some are roughly free-form. Years ago I ate the latter rendition in New York at the San Gennaro Street Festival in Little Italy, (which is held in September, so these aren’t just for Christmas) and he loved them so much he knew we needed a post about them.

Our version here is based on the Beignet recipe from our book New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day; the dough is no-knead, of course, and is lightly flavored with orange and lemon. I must admit I was a little nervous not pulling out my doughnut cutter to make perfect circles, but we need to embrace the irregular shape: let go and toss the roughly-shaped dough in to the very hot oil.

The golden brown Zeppole that emerged a few minutes later were absolutely delicious; their haphazard shapes gave them a charming quality, and the gentle citrus flavors were lovely. I’m not Italian, but these really are too good not to anyone’s Holiday tradition. And if you’ve been to the blog before at this time of year, you’ll remember these zeppole are very, very similar to Hannukah soufganiot (see the soufganiot post for more on frying up doughnuts).

On Instagram.com/breadin5, you can watch an Instagram reel and see us make the zeppole! WE’VE RE-SCHEDULED OUT INSTAGRAM-LIVE EVENT ON THESE DOUGHNUTS FOR FRIDAY, 1/28/22, SEE YOU AT INSTAGRAM.COM/BREADIN5 (it’s still there…).

Zeppole

This recipe is based on the beignet recipe from our book, New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, page 316.

2 3/4 cup lukewarm water

1/4 cup orange juice

1 tablespoon Red Star Platinum yeast

1/4 cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon lemon zest (you will need a microplane zester)

1 tablespoon Morton Kosher Salt

6 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Vegetable Oil – 3 to 4 inches deep (use a pot that is large enough that your oil is not sitting too high in the pot)

Confectioners’ sugar for sprinkling

Combine the warm water, orange juice yeast, sugar, lemon zest, and salt in a 5-quart bowl; preferably, in a lidded (not airtight) plastic container or food-grade bucket. Mix until all of the flour is incorporated using a stand mixer or dough whisk. Cover, and allow to rise at room temperature for 2 hours. You can use the dough right away, or refrigerate it for up to 14 days.

On Baking Day (if you need to see a visual, you can check out our other post on doughnuts here, with more pictures on shaping and frying):

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, and lightly grease the parchment.

Pull out 3 oz pieces of dough (peach-sized) piece of dough, and flatten them slightly (the whole bucket of dough will make 15 to 20 zeppole, but you can do fewer pieces if desired). Place them on the prepared pan and cover with a lightly greased piece of plastic. Allow the dough to sit for at least 20 minutes (and up to one hour) while the oil heats up.

Once your oil reads 360-370°F on a Candy Thermometer you are ready to fry. Use a slotted spoon or Basket Strainer to flip the doughnuts over after about 2 minutes and then to take them out of the oil once they are golden brown on both sides. This works best with two people – have one person shape the dough, and the other to manage the submerging and turning. Try to keep the oil temperature as consistent as possible. Lay them out on paper towel to allow some of the oil to drain off. Let the zeppole sit for a few minutes, then lightly dust with confectioners’ sugar. Serve warm.

Note: Red Star Yeast provided yeast samples for recipe testing, and sponsors BreadIn5’s website and other promotional activities.This website is reader-supported; BreadIn5, LLC earns affiliate commissions when buying products through links on this website.

Jeff will be signing books and answering questions at Magers & Quinn in Minneapolis, October 12!

The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day will be released on Tuesday, October 12, 2021, and my favorite independent bookstore, Magers and Quinn Booksellers in Minneapolis (3038 Hennepin Av., Minneapolis MN 55408) asked me to stop by on publication-date to sign books and chat with people (I’ll also be handing out bread samples, but please be fully vaccinated if you’d like to try the bread). It’s October 12, 7:00pm to 8:30pm. Here’s the info and RSVP link from Magers and Quinn:

Jeff Hertzberg signs The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day: Favorite Recipes from Breadin5

From 7:00pm – 8:30pm, Co-author Jeff Hertzberg will be at Magers & Quinn on the publication date of his latest cookbook, The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day. Stop by for a signed copy, meet the author, and sample some delicious bread!

For this special signing-only event, we appreciate RSVPs to help us gauge interest and estimate book quantity needs, but anyone is welcome to swing by! RSVP HERE

About the book: With nearly one million copies of their five books in print, Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François, authors of the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day series, have proven that people—and after a year of pandemic lockdown, more people than ever before—want to bake their own bread, and they want to do it easily and quickly.

With THE BEST OF ARTISAN BREAD IN FIVE MINUTES A DAY, Jeff and Zoë have chosen their absolute favorite 80 recipes from all five of their books, bringing them together into a single volume that is the only bread book a baker needs, including:
• The best of the European and American artisan traditions
• Whole grain loaves
• Pizza and flatbread
• Brioche, challah, and other sweet or enriched breads
• Gluten-free recipes
• Natural sourdough bread

In addition to old favorites, the book includes new tricks, tips, and techniques that Jeff and Zoë have learned along the way.

With this revolutionary stored-dough technique—along with color and instructional black-and-white photographs, chapters on ingredients, equipment, and a baking products resource list—readers can have stunning, delicious bread on Day One. THE BEST OF ARTISAN BREAD IN FIVE MINUTES A DAY will make everyone a baker—with only five minutes a day of active preparation time. And this greatest-hits collection will make the perfect holiday gift.

A note about in person events:

We are very excited to bring authors and readers back together in our space, and we know you are too!

As we all navigate the transition back to congregating in person, we ask that you use honesty, care, and understanding in interacting with fellow event-goers, staff, and authors.

Please note that Magers & Quinn will always comply with current city and state regulations, and reserves the right to change the below policies at any time. These are guidelines only, and if you have questions about the most up to date information, you can always call us at 612-822-4611.

Q: Are masks required?

A: Masks are not currently required in our building, but are highly recommended.

For the health and safety of others, we strongly encourage you to wear a mask, especially if not fully vaccinated for COVID-19.

Q: Are in store events free?

A: Yes, Magers & Quinn events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

Q: Do I need to RSVP?

A: For this special signing-only event, we appreciate RSVPs to help us gauge interest and estimate book quantity needs, but anyone is welcome to swing by!

Apple-Peach Braided Brioche Cake

apple-peach brioche cake

‘At no other time (than autumn) does the earth let itself be inhaled in one smell, the ripe earth; in a smell that is in no way inferior to the smell of the sea, bitter where it borders on taste, and more honeysweet where you feel it touching the first sounds. Containing depth within itself, darkness, something of the grave almost.’ – Rainer Maria Rilke

I’ve got peaches and apples in my kitchen. Summer is gently fading, and autumn is slipping in with an occasional cool breeze, a golden leaf here and there. I don’t know how August is already over, but here is September with its crisp ciders and juicy pears. I’m ready for bread-making again, and am starting the cooler months off with this brioche cake.The juicy peaches and the apple-cinnamon flavor are a good combination; a perfect intermingling of the seasons.

Apple-Peach Brioche Cake
Inspired by this Braided Cinnamon, Apple, and Pecan Bread from Floating Kitchen.

1 pound Whole Wheat Brioche or regular Brioche

Filling
1 small apple, peeled and grated (I used a Gala apple)
1/4 cup granulated sugar
Pinch salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 cup peeled and diced peaches

Glaze
1 cup confectioner’s sugar
2-4 tablespoons water

Remove 1 pound of dough from your dough bucket, and place it on a generously floured surface. Knead the dough a few times, and shape into a ball. Cover with a tea towel and let rest on the counter for 15-20 minutes.

While the dough is resting, peel the apple, and then grate it directly over a clean dish towel. Wring out the dish towel over a small bowl or liquid measuring cup, catching all the apple juice. Set the grated apple aside to use later. Pour the apple juice into a small saucepan, and add the granulated sugar and salt. Bring to a boil over medium heat, and let simmer until the liquid is reduced by half and starting to turn sticky. Remove from the heat and let cool slightly.

Add the brown sugar and cinnamon to the slightly cooled apple juice, and stir to combine. Add the grated apple pieces and stir again to combine. Set aside.

brioche cake

Line a half sheet pan with parchment paper. Grease the ring of a 10-inch springform pan.

Once the dough is ready, roll it to a 1/4-inch thick rectangle, using flour as needed to keep it from sticking to the counter. Brush the melted butter over the dough. Use an off-set spatula to spread the apple-sugar mixture evenly over the butter, leaving a 1/2 border around the edges. Sprinkle with the chopped peaches. Starting with the long end of the dough, carefully roll the dough into a log. Gently transfer the log to the prepared sheet pan (you may need to use a bench scraper or spatula to help move it). Mine fit on the sheet pan diagonally. Chill the log in the refrigerator for 20 minutes, or until firm.

brioche cake

Using a scissors or sharp knife, gently cut the roll into half lengthwise so the layers of dough and filling are visible, but leave one end still attached by about 3/4-inch.

brioche cake

With the cut sides facing up, gently press together one end of each half, and then lift the right half over the left half, and continue until you have braided the entire roll. Press the ends together.

brioche cake

Starting at the cut end, gently spiral the braid into a circle, no bigger than 9-inches across, making sure not to leave any holes or gaps. If any peaches fall out, tuck them back inside the braid. It’s okay if a little filling leaks around the edges, too.

brioche cake

Place the ring of the spring form pan around the bread. Cover with plastic wrap or a dishtowel and let the dough rise in a warm place for 1-1/2 hours, until puffed and touching (or almost touching) the sides of the pan.

brioche cake

Adjust an oven rack to the middle position, and heat the oven to 350F.

Remove the plastic wrap, but leave the spring form pan around the dough. Bake for about 25-30 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown. Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack for 15 minutes. Gently remove the spingform ring from the bread (if it’s sticking, use a thin knife or off-set spatula to help release it).

brioche cake

For the icing
Put the powdered sugar into a medium bowl. Add 2 tablespoons water, and mix until combined. If the icing is too thick, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the desired consistency is reached. Drizzle over warm the warm bread.

brioche cake

Best eaten warm. Enjoy!

Watching Zoë Bakes on Magnolia Network!

I was working on another show concept when I heard that Chip and Joanna Gaines were starting Magnolia Network. I called the producer I had been working with and said something to the effect of “THAT’S MY DREAM NETWORK!”

Yes, I said it in all caps.

I have always admired the passion and intensity that Joanna and Chip have for the work they do, but still impart so much joy into their projects. That resonates with me.

Baking is a craft I LOVE and want to share that with the world. I couldn’t think of a better platform to do that on than Magnolia Network and I am sooooo grateful they felt the same way when they saw my audition “sizzle” and invited me to join their community of creators.

Zoë François measuring ingredients in her Minneapolis kitchen

Zoë Bakes is more than a show about baking, although there is lots of that too. It is an ode to my entire food community in Minneapolis. I am excited to share this town with people, who may not know its long tradition of baking.

Minneapolis sits on the Mississippi river and was developed as a wheat milling town. Those old mills (now museums and restaurants) still stand on the banks of the river as a reminder of our roots. My house is in a neighborhood built by the wheat barons. The history is everywhere. The current community of farmers, millers, and bakers have rich stories to tell and I am so honored to share them on Zoë Bakes.

Episodes Available Now | Zoe Bakes on Magnolia Network

Watch Zoe Bakes on Magnolia Network on discovery+ or on the Magnolia Network | Time Well Spent app

Zoë François sits with neighbors and family on her porch in the Porch Parties episode of Zoë Bakes on Magnolia Network.

Episode 1: Porch Party Pies

Zoë François bakes up a table full of irresistible pies and cooks up one of her favorite desserts to share with friends and family on her porch as they kick off their annual tradition of welcoming spring back to Minnesota.
Recipes: Strawberry Rhubarb Pie | Strawberry Fool

Zoë stands with a tray of biscuits made with Justin Sutherland at Handsome Hog on Zoë Bakes on Magnolia Network

Episode 2: Biscuit Bake

Zoë is invited to a backyard barbecue and visits a local chef known for his biscuit baking. She incorporates his tips into her own recipes as she makes two of her favorite Southern-inspired sweets.
Recipes: Tender & Flaky Homemade Biscuits | Banana Pudding | Biscuit Topped Cobbler

Zoë François of Pie and Mighty, showing Zoë François how to make her grandmother's angel pie on Zoë Bakes on Magnolia Network

Episode 3: Making Meringue

Zoë dives into the magic of meringue when she bakes it into a Pavlova (from Zoë Bakes Cakes), a whipped cream and fruit-filled dessert, for a dinner party with friends. She also visits a local pie maker who has mastered the art of meringue and uses it as a crust.
Recipes: Pavlova | Stephanie Meyer’s Beef Stew

Pastry chef Minda Ringdahl shows host Zoe Francois decorating techniques, as seen on Zoe Bakes, season 1.

Episode 4: Decorating Cakes

Zoë surprises her best friend by making a devil’s food cake (from Zoë Bakes Cakes) topped with champagne buttercream for her anniversary. She also shares her tips for piping roses and borders, and explores current trends in cake design at a local cakery.
Recipes: Devil’s Food Cake | Swiss Meringue Buttercream

Host Zoe Francois tastes different honey varieties with Brian Fredrickson, owner of Ames Farm

Episode 5: Buzzworthy Bakes

Zoë bakes a beehive-shaped birthday cake (from Zoë Bakes Cakes) for her beekeeper dad, complete with marzipan bees and a variety of honeys from her visit to a honey farm. Then, she whips up baked doughnuts with a honey glaze.
Recipe: Beehive Cake

Host Zoe Francois and baker Sarah Kieffer

Episode 6: Cookie Delivery

Zoë wants to give her college son a taste of home by baking delicious chocolate chip cookies that highlight a friend’s fun technique. Later, she sends everything but the milk when she includes a variety of customized brownies.

Recipes: Sarah Kieffer’s Pan-Banging Chocolate Chip Cookies | Zoë’s Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies
Sarah’s Book: 100 Cookies

Host Zoe Francois with friends at her backyard pizza party.

Episode 7: Pizza Farm

Zoë visits a pizza farm to learn about her new wood-fired pizza oven and how to use it for baking at home. Then, she gets inspired to create a pizza farm experience in her own backyard for a group of friends.

More information about my Fontana Forni Pizza Oven and Copper Olive Oil Cruet.

Episode 8: Apple Classics

Zoë kicks off apple season by visiting an orchard and picking new varieties to put a twist on her classic Apple Bundt Cake. She also whips up a few childhood favorites like a Dutch Baby and pink applesauce to share with a friend.
Recipes: Apple Cake with Honey Cider GlazeDutch Baby

Episode 9: Coffee Break

Zoë explores a Scandinavian tradition called fika, a coffee break with sweets, when she visits a local bakery and finds inspiration for a new twist on her Cinnamon Braid. Then, she makes a Cardamom Pear Cake and enjoys both with an old friend.
Recipe: Pear-Cardamom Cake

More episodes coming soon!

Want to learn more about the guests on my show and receive exclusive recipes from them? Sign up for my Substack where I’ll be featuring Q&As with the featured guests, exclusive recipes, and much more.


Zoë François sprinkling salt on warm chocolate chip cookies

The Fundamentals of Baking: Cookies

Check out my first Magnolia Workshop, now available on the Magnolia Network app! Download the app “Magnolia | Time Well Spent” and watch my cookie workshop series to learn all about the fundamentals of baking cookies. There are nine chapters that will guide you through some of my favorite recipes and help you create YOUR perfect cookie! This course is basically my Chocolate Chip Cookie 101 blog post on steroids where I bring you step by step through my process of changing a cookie to the texture and flavor profile you love. To find my course, open the app, find “Create,” then click “Workshops” and you’ll see me there!Photos courtesy Magnolia Network

Join us Friday, August 13 for an Instagram Live event: Pizza and flatbread on the grill

Zoe and I did a live broadcast on Instagram (Click to view the recording on Instagram), grilling pizzas and flatbreads outdoors on the gas grill, on Friday, August 13. We demo’d the method, from dough-mixing to topping, to finishing beautiful pizza and flatbread right on the gas grill—keeping your house cool this summer. You’ll be able to post questions for us to answer right to Instagram, and answered questions in real time—pizza questions or anything else about our method.

And as always, we answer questions right here…

New book! The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: Favorite Recipes from BreadIn5

Hey friends:

My new book, “The Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day: Favorite Recipes from BreadIn5,” is now available for pre-order (shipping October 12, 2021). I was excited and grateful to be asked to do a “greatest-hits” compilation. Through the lockdowns and trials of the past 18 months, the conversation continued here on the website, hearing what you were looking for and clarifying which recipes really mattered. The new book reflects those conversations, and it’s perfect for anyone who wants a curated collection of the all-time favorite recipes from my seven previous books on super-fast stored dough—for yourself or for the ABin5 newbies on your holiday shopping list. You’ll find:

  • The best of the European and American artisan traditions
  • Whole grain loaves
  • Pizza and flatbread
  • Brioche, challah, and other sweet or enriched breads
  • Gluten-free recipes (a few)
  • Natural sourdough bread

But enough from me—the multitalented Andrew Zimmern graciously agreed to write the foreword to the book so I’ll let him speak for me:

From the Foreword by Andrew Zimmern:

“… the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes se­ries is [proves] that the world’s easiest yeasted loaf, the most versatile bread dough recipe (even pizza!), can be taken in so many directions and have so many ap­plications that it has created a series of hits, launched a gazillion home bakers on their own bread journey, and spawned, finally, a Best of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day… This series redefined bread baking for America, long before the Covid-19 sourdough craze. This se­ries of books launched on a simple premise: bread baking can be easy, simple, and anyone can do it. Then it took off—and took on healthy breads, hydration ratios, flatbreads, gluten-free breads, holiday breads, pizza, and more. That’s what happens in our culture: Success breeds more success and, in this case, more books…”

—Andrew Zimmern

Thanks Andrew!

Grilled Veggie Pizza for July 4th with Red Star Yeast

Grilled pizza is a favorite summer pastime for us; we have spent many hot summer days making everything from Pesto Pizza to Breakfast Pizzas. Today we want to share one of our favorite pizzas with you: Grilled Pizza with Summer Veggies. We keep our crust crisp by grilling one side, flipping it, and then adding just enough fresh veggies and cheese. Eating a slice of warm, grilled pizza is truly magical.

Below you will find our directions to making pizza on the gas grill. Please note that we do call for a baking stone in our recipe, but you can attempt this right on the grates if you don’t have one (but a baking stone does make things a little easier). If you only have a charcoal grill, we have a post here on how to use that.

If you head to our Breadin5 Instagram page, you can watch our reels and see us make the pizza on the grill! 

(Need a refresher on grilling pizzas? Check out all our tips and tricks here.)

Grilled Veggie Pizza

Pizza Dough

3 cups lukewarm water
1/8 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon Platinum Yeast from Red Star
1 tablespoon sugar or honey
1 tablespoon kosher salt
7 cups bread flour

Ingredients for finishing

1/3 cup pizza sauce

1/2 cup of bell peppers (we used a mixture of green, red, and yellow), sliced thin

1/4 cup yellow onion, sliced thin

1/4 cup mushrooms, sliced thin

3/4 cup mozzarella cheese, shredded

For the dough

Combine the warm water, olive oil, yeast, sugar, and salt in a 5-quart bowl; preferably, in a lidded (not airtight) plastic container or food-grade bucket. Mix until all of the flour is incorporated using a stand mixer or dough whisk. Cover, and allow to rise at room temperature for 2 hours. You can use the dough right away, or refrigerate it for up to 14 days.

To Grill the Pizza
Heat your gas grill: Place a baking stone on the primary burners. Turn all burners to high and let heat up for 20 minutes. After they have heated, turn the side without the stone down to low heat.

While your grill is heating, pull out a 10 ounce piece of dough from your bucket and quickly form it into a ball. Let it sit on the counter while you gather your toppings.

Roll the ball out into a 1/8-inch-thick round. If the ball is resisting just let it sit for about 5 minutes and it will relax and allow you to work with it.

Using a floured pizza peel, place the shaped pizza dough over the pizza stone. Let it cook there until the top starts to bubble and the bottom creates a char to your liking. Remove the pizza from the grill and place on a nearby work surface. Making sure the charred-side is up, top your pizza: cover the pizza with sauce, veggies, and then the cheese.

Then, using your pizza peel, bring the pizza back to the grill, and finish cooking. Place over the hot side again, keeping a very careful watch. As soon as your char-marks look great, slide the pizza over to the cool side and cover the grill. Let cook for 4 to 10 minutes, until the cheese has melted. Remove the pizza from the grill, move to a wire rack, and let cool for a minute or two. Slice into pieces and serve.

Tip: If your pizza cheese won’t brown on the grill, you can use a kitchen torch to give it some color.

Note: Red Star Yeast provided yeast samples for recipe testing, and sponsors BreadIn5’s website and other promotional activities. This website is reader-supported; BreadIn5, LLC earns affiliate commissions when buying products through links on this website.