Brioche Dough Recipe

Brioche Dough Recipe | Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

Here is a classic fall recipe with a twist. I’ve added the tartness of pomegranate seeds to the mellow sweetness of pears and draped the whole thing in a rich, buttery, tender brioche dough. It is a lovely and quick dessert, especially if you have a bucket of brioche on hand. For those of you who do not already own The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, here is the recipe and it can be used for all of these wonderful treats: caramel sticky buns, grilled fruit tart, fresh fruit muffins, Brioche à tête, apricot pastries and fabulous doughnuts! Actually the possibilities are endless, just use your imagination and let us know what treats you’ve come up with.

Brioche Dough (makes about 4 loaves)

1 1/2 cups lukewarm water

1 tablespoon Red Star Platinum, Active Dry, or Quick-Rise yeast (1 packet)

1 tablespoons kosher salt

8 large eggs at room temperature, lightly beaten

1/2 cup honey (this is my all time favorite!)

1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) unsalted butter, melted

7 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

Mix the yeast, salt, eggs honey and melted butter with the water in a 5-quart bowl, or lidded (not airtight) food container.

Mix in the flour, using a spoon until all of the flour is incorporated.

Cover (not airtight), and allow to sit at room temperature for about two hours. Note: Sometimes with brioche, with so much cold egg, if you don’t use warm enough water, the initial rise can be very slow. Professionals would fix this by letting the eggs come to room temperature, which solves the problem. You can do that, or just make sure that your final mixture of egg/butter/water is nice and warm (but not hot, or you can kill the yeast).

The dough can be used as soon as it is chilled. This dough is way too sticky to use after the initial rise, but once it is chilled it is very easy to handle. It can be used to create the Tatin or any of these brioche recipes: caramel sticky buns, grilled fruit tart, Fresh Fruit Muffins, Brioche à tête, apricot pastries and fabulous doughnuts! The dough can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. After that you can freeze the dough.



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494 thoughts on “Brioche Dough Recipe

  1. Hi,
    Just added a little lemon zest and vanilla to your brioche recipe and adapted a recipe for Portuguese sweet muffins, “Bolos Levedos” (a lovely light stovetop bread) to fit your method. The result was very nice! And the smell of this lemon and vanilla flavored bread on the griddle…wow.

    Thanks again for your recipes 🙂

  2. I have a question about your change in the brioche dough recipe in the number of eggs used. The original recipe in your first and second books using 8 eggs versus your Holiday book using 6. My apologies if I have missed your explanations but I have not found a reference in the text about why the change. Thank you in advance.

    1. Some of the recipes in the Holiday book that use that dough call for complicated shaping techniques, and the eggier, wetter dough from the earlier books didn’t hold their shape quite as well.

  3. How can I convert this recipe to Gluten Free?
    Can I use Gluten Free flour as the only exchange?
    Please let me know what you think I should use, thank you.

    PS: I just love all of your recipes, and my kids love it as well, but my husband and son were recently diagnosed with Celiac Disease and I’m just learning how to convert regular recipes that my family loves to Gluten Free for 2 people instead of 5, its been very challenging to cook 2 separate meals almost every day of the week. thank you in advance.

    1. We have a whole universe of gluten-free recipes in our books; mostly in Gluten Free Bread In Five Minutes a Day (http://amzn.to/1msOBmY), which has many enriched recipes including brioche, based on GF flours, including our own mixture.

    1. You must mean bread flour, and the answer is that you can, but it’s really not traditional to use it in brioche, which is meant to be very soft and tender. You would need to increase the water though, maybe a quarter cup, or half that for starters, depending on which brand of bread flour.

  4. Third try. Desperate. Please help. My brioche from Healthy Bread was way, way too wet, even after two days in the fridge. More batter than dough. It literally splashed in the mixing bowl. Recipe says oil instead of butter is okay, but is it possible that that’s the problem — oil is a liquid. Managed to bake it by getting it into pans. But please help solve the problem

  5. i’ve asked a question three times and stupidly thought the answer would come in my e-mail, or at least a notification for it. Now I see that I need to return to the page where I posted the question. But I have no idea how to do that. I just clicked on the question choice, typed in my question and sent it. You probably answered me the first time, but….

    (It was about too loose dough for brioche)

  6. Hi! Thanks for sharing these wonderful recipes! Just curious how many pounds of dough does the brioche recipe produce? (Just trying time figure out how many items I can make from this recipe). Also if making a simple brioche loaf, how much room do you leave in the loaf pan to account for rising during baking?

    1. It’s about 5 pounds of dough. We like a generous fill, so 3/4 of the way up the pan. Smaller loaves are a little easier for beginners to handle in terms of being confident that it’s baked all the way through.

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