Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour (Mixture #1 from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day)

Flour Mixture #1 from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in 5

By keeping a supply of our two gluten-free flour mixtures in the house, you can make any of the recipes in Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day. Flour Mixture #1, reprinted here from the book, is for a mostly white flour, though it becomes 75% whole-grain by weight if you swap brown rice flour (increase the liquids in the recipes by 2 tablespoons if you do this). It’s the only flour you need for some of our on-line recipes, and for the basic white loaf. If you’re sensitive to any of these ingredients, you’ll find substitutions in the book. We tested this flour mixture with Bob’s Red Mill products because they are available across the nation. If you use other brands you may find different results in the breads–especially in the amount of liquid they’ll absorb.

If you’re measuring by U.S. cup-measures (the first unit in each line), be sure to pack the flour tightly into the cup, as if you were measuring brown sugar.

Makes 4 1/4 pounds (2 kilograms) of flour mixture

White Rice Flour6 cups, or 36 ounces, or 1,020 grams

Sorghum flour: 3 1/4 cups, or 1 pound, or 455 grams

Tapioca Flour or Starch: 1 3/4 cups, or 8 ounces, or 225 grams

Potato Starch*: 1 1/4 cups, or 8 ounces, or 225 grams

Xanthan Gum or Psyllium Husk Powder: 1/4 cup, or 1.4 ounces, or 40 grams

*Don’t substitute potato flour

The ingredients must be very well mixed, otherwise the xanthan gum or psyllium will not be evenly distributed and your loaves will be inconsistent. Whisk and mix the ingredients in a 5- to 6-quart lidded container. Finish by picking up the container and vigorously shaking until the flours are completely blended.

Substituting ingredients: If you don’t eat one of the ingredients above, see our Substitutions Page. Other substitutions may be possible, but those are the ones we’ve tested and liked.

The Flatbread Braid, New Video: How to Braid a Flat Circle

Braided

Zoe did a great post last month on a traditional braided loaf (made with peasant dough). I thought now might be a nice time to do a new video (it’s way at the bottom of this post), showing one of my favorite techniques, the flatbread braid. Flat or traditional tall, these techniques also work great with challah or brioche dough (but you need to bake those lower temp (350F) because of the egg and sweetener in the challah or brioche). As in the photo, you can turn around a straight braid to make a very festive ring, and I topped it with egg wash and poppy seeds. This dough is about 50/50 whole wheat and white flour, which is a wheatier version of the Light Whole Wheat (you don’t have to use the “old” dough). The 50/50 recipe appears in The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day(more…)

Zoe and I are working on a new book, but she’s not allowed to tell you what it’s about if you see her demo in New York City on Thursday

Zoe at Architectural Digest

Zoe will be doing baking demonstrations at the 2014 Architectural Digest Home Design Show in New York City. Her event this Thursday, March 20, 2014 is only open to “the trade,” folks who are in the home design or cooking industries. But this supposedly includes food bloggers, so please see the show’s website for details if that applies to you. The Friday, Saturday, and Sunday events are open to the public (though Zoe won’t be presenting those days).

I’m sure she’ll appreciate the change of pace, because the last month or so has been nuts–we’ve been feverishly editing our next book. Unfortunately, our publisher will kill us if we say more about what’s actually in it. If you see Zoe in New York Thursday, she’s been instructed to say that mum’s the word. We can say that it has nothing to do with The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, which came out five months ago. Our new project is a completely different kind of book filled with completely different material.

Stay tuned…

Shopping for Bread-Bakers

People always ask us about our favorite bread-baking tools, so here are some of them, with links to Amazon:

Thermometer

A thermometer: you really can’t get a good crust until you know your oven’s temp. They’re cheap and effective.

Baking Stone

Baking stone: For a great, crisp, crust, you really need one, and this 1/2-inch thick Old Stone brand has been very durable for us. There are other stone/iron options, see our post on that. (more…)

The Refrigerator Rise Trick on Crazy-Busy Thanksgiving Morning: Fresh Rolls (Kürbiskernbrot) from the German Alps

 Before we even start with this, you should know that this reprised Thanksgiving post is one of many– click here for all our Thanksgiving posts over the years.

Some people shy away from yeast breads and rolls at busy holidays because they think the proofing step (the rest after the loaves or rolls are shaped) is too time-consuming, even with our stored dough.  Here’s a great way to get around that–form rolls or loaves the night before, refrigerate overnight and they’re ready for the oven in the morning. (more…)